Meet the staff: Lawrence Spector

Lawrence SpectorLawrence Spector was working in New Hampshire doing internal medicine but felt as though he was lacking something when it came to providing overall care for patients.

That’s what drew him to Family First Health – the idea of having one organization that has medical, dental and social services. The whole package for the whole patient.

York might seem like a random jump from 25 years in New Hampshire, but Spector has family here. His sister lives in the area and had a baby a few years ago. The rest of the family came down to be close to his nephew. So in a way, moving to York is like moving home for him.

Spector spent time in the U.S. Army in the early 2000s before completing nursing school, working 10 years in an ICU and going back to graduate school for more education. He brings all that background to our Lewisberry Center where he’s just starting as a new provider.

When he’s not working or house hunting, Spector says he’s looking forward to spending more time with his family and checking out the outdoors in central Pennsylvania. From hiking trails to teaching his nephew to fish, he’s excited to see what the area has to offer. He also loves taking his nephew to Hersheypark.

puppy

This is NOT Adam but I had to Google English sheepdog puppies. How cute are they!?

Spector also has his hands full with his old English sheepdog puppy – Adam.

Meet the staff: Victoria Lorenz

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Michigan native Victoria Lorenz was looking to try something new. So she left the only place she’d ever lived to move to Pennsylvania and attend school at Salus University. She wasn’t totally alone though, since her sister – 4 years her senior – lived in nearby Lancaster.

Once she graduated from school, she started looking around for options. She knew she wanted to work with the underserved. And she was always interested in family medicine. She stumbled across Family First Health online, liked our website and the rest is now history – or at least the start of a new story.

“I always wanted to do this,” she said. So far, she’s loving what she does working with patients at our George Street Center. She thinks the staff is pretty great, too.

When she’s not working at George Street, Lorenz admits she’s a Netflix addict. Some of her favorite shows to binge watch include The Walking Dead, Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal and The Vampire Diaries. She also loves watching movies, reading and shopping. When it comes to sports, Lorenz played volleyball in school and is also a fan of basketball, baseball and soccer.

Her teams? All Michigan, of course.

Dr. Go on her dream of being a doctor

On Doctor’s Day last week, our CEO Jenny Englerth sent out a note thanking our providers for choosing Family First Health and for the work that they do.

Our Medical Director Asceline Go responded to Jenny to say how working at a community health center like ours fulfilled her dream of being a “village” doctor. Read more below.

Thanks to Dr. Go and the rest of our providers for everything they do! Asceline Go 046

Growing up, I have always dreamed of being a “village” doctor and always had a feeling of guilt having chosen to practice in a first world country. Unbeknownst to me, serving our community and working in a Community Health Center actually fulfilled that dream.

Years ago when I did my citizenship examination, the CIS/Citizenship and Immigration Services officer hardly asked me any exam questions in order to pass for citizenship eligibility which I had painstakingly prepared for and was ready to sing the Star Spangled Banner on his prompting. When asked, he merely thanked me for doing my work and deciding to serve my chosen community.

I appreciate the recognition given to physicians today. I believe though that it is a collective effort with not one more important than the other and so everyone needs to be recognized and appreciated.

I am blessed to find my niche.

Thank you Jenny for your leadership and support.

Talk to your doctor about your colon

March is  Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month so we’re going to be dropping knowledge like …

Jokes aside, colon cancer is often treatable if caught early. Many more lives could be saved by understanding risks, increasing screening rates and small lifestyle changes.

The American Cancer Society released some information about screenings to help healthcare providers identify who they need to reach out to – and the results are very interesting.

Rates

  • The rate of colon cancer in the U.S. is down 30 percent over the last decade. YAY.
  • More and more people are getting screened – 56 percent of people were screened in 2002, 65 percent in 2010. Another YAY.
  • And more people have insurance coverage for colon cancer screenings – making cost less of an issue. Hooray!
  • BUT it’s not enough. The American Cancer Society wants to get the screening rate to 80 percent by 2018. If they can do so, that’s 203,000 lives that will be saved by 2030.

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Saving children’s teeth – a team effort

They say it takes a village to raise a child. So why not use a village to help educate parents and children to the importance of oral health?

We already know it’s a problem. Tooth decay is the No. 1 chronic disease facing children in America. Nearly 1 in 4 children between the ages of 2-5 have had tooth decay. And two-thirds will have had a cavity by their teens.

And we know that there’s something you can do – by making a donation as small as $25, you’re getting toothbrushes into the hands of 10 kids. 

But what then? That’s the question that’s been plaguing experts and people invested in children’s dental care. And one that’s honestly been driving me a little bit nuts since I started seeing the work our Kids Against Cavities program does.

You’ve seen the numbers. You’ve been asked to help. But how do we break the cycle and bring about change? Continue reading

Let’s talk facts about children’s dental health

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LaJuan Mountain, our York dental director, was one of three dentists working on 93 children at VIDA Charter School in Gettysburg recently. Kids are screened for problems and notes are sent home with the goal of getting these kids into a dental home with routine, preventative care.

We’ve shown you our numbers – that out of 1,887 York County kids, our Kids Against Cavities staff found 2,351 cavities in 2015.

In our second Pre-K Counts visit of 2016, we screened 27 kids and found 87 cavities. In an hour and a half last week, we screened 93 kids at VIDA Charter School in Gettysburg.

We hope these numbers shock you. And then we ask you to help. With just the donation of $25, you can get 10 kids toothbrushes and toothpaste. 10 kids. Last week, I saw more than 10 kids who straight up told me they did not brush their teeth. Many said they didn’t have time. Maybe they just forget. One third grader told me her sister threw her toothbrush out and her parents hadn’t bought a new one.

They wouldn’t buy her a new toothbrush – something you could get at the dollar store. It’s something that just blows my mind because brushing my teeth twice a day is something my parents have always taught me. Many of the people I’ve talked to about our Kids Against Cavities program agree and are just as flabbergasted. And yet, grateful that it’s something we just grew up doing. We were taught it was important. Continue reading

WOW card winners for January

wowcardDid you know that at Family First Health we have “WOW” cards?

It’s a chance for staff to nominate other employees who they see doing something the exemplify our guiding principals.

What are our principals you may ask:

“Patient Centered” – “Respectful” – “Serves Everyone” – “Fiscally Responsible” – “ Continuous Improvement and Innovation” – “Integrity” – “Collaborative”

Not only does the employee, supervisor and CEO get to see who’s WOWing who in the office, but each month, a drawing done by HR will choose the winners of 3 $50 Giant gift cards.

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